Art Basel Hong Kong

Art Basel Hong Kong

Tour Asia’s Hot Art Market Art Basel Hong Kong By Ingrid Chen Art enthusiasts in Hong Kong had to wait until 2008 to quench their creative thirst. ART Hong Kong debuted that year and quickly rose to become the largest and arguably, the most important art event in Asia. Previously, many considered Hong Kong to be only a financial center, and a ‘cultural desert’. Within a few years after launching the art fair, Hong Kong was recognized as the art hub of Asia. In 2011, the art fair was acquired and rebranded as Art Basel Hong Kong (ART HK). Today, ART HK is the crown jewel of Asia’s art fairs and will take place March 24 – 26th. The 2016 edition of Art Basel Hong Kong, now in its fourth year, brings in 239 galleries. Half of the galleries are from the Asia Pacific region. Each year, after the New York Armory Show, the art world turns its eyes to Hong Kong in March. The Art Basel brand combined with the potential of the Asia market, pulls in top galleries from around the world. Each gallery brings their best, or most sellable artists, to attract collectors in the region. Many galleries use the fair to test the water, before setting up their branches in Hong Kong. But what makes Hong Kong the ideal location for such a fair? Some dealers praise the efficiency and convenience of Hong Kong’s infrastructure, logistics, and international connectivity. Fluency in English is another advantage. Hong Kong also boasts being the third largest art market by auction sales. International auction houses such as Sotheby’s, recently...
Chinese Wonton Noodling

Chinese Wonton Noodling

Chinese Wonton Noodling The Lunar New Year Story & Photos by Jo Yee   As I sit here and write this I hear the clang of stainless steel bowls, pots and pans, vibrating through my mother’s hundred year old house in New England. I’m now thousands of miles away in London, but sometimes I swear her pitter-patter in the kitchen is still loud enough to stir me awake in the early dawn, as if my bedroom is still just three yards away. She is anything but predictable when it comes to most things but her penchant for noise pollution in the kitchen can be timed to cockcrow.     Wonton noodle soup is not the most classic of lunar new year dishes, I cannot recall a time when it was made specifically for a new year in my mother’s household, but it is laden with symbolism of good fortune. In the length of noodles there is longevity; good tidings of abundance is wrapped up in a wonton, like presents. I don’t know who makes this stuff up, but whoever it is has great taste in food, so I do not protest.     Wonton noodle soup is to my family what a full English Breakfast is to England. My maternal grandfather was the wonton noodle man, in the midst of Saigon streets filled with steaming pho bo pots. His product was handmade and homemade. He did just well enough to raise a hearty family of fourteen. While he never made it to the States, my aunts, and his youngest two daughters, brought with them a tradition of cooking up...
Norway’s Zen Retreat

Norway’s Zen Retreat

Norway’s Zen Retreat Juvet Landscape Hotel By Mackenzie Lowry     Imagine being able to finally reach a zen state – a total connection of body, mind, and feeling one with the Earth. It’s hard to find zen on an average day, bustling through city streets. Yet, when one retreats to the Burtigarden Farm in Valldal, Norway to check into the Juvet Landscape Hotel, zen is almost an instant gratification.     The architecture of the hotel is modern and sublime, while simultaneously appearing as a small detail in this grand natural vista. Seven individual “landscape rooms” have one or two walls, that are entirely made of glass.     Each of these walls has its own peaceful view of the landscape, creating the feeling of literally being outside.     The dark interiors may at first seem off‐putting, but they are purposely designed that way as to not draw away from the scenery. Minimalist Norwegian log houses or “Bird nesting houses,” are also an option for guests, who want a lighter interior and a more classic woodsy experience.     The cabins also contain window frames designed by Norwegian artist Knut Wold. The Juvet facilities also include a spa area with hot tubs and fireplaces.     For the wild at heart, Juvet offers a bounty of all year around activities. You can ski in the Spring sunshine, April ‐ June, while wearing shorts and a T‐shirt. Summer is the high season for rafting, climbing, fjord fishing, kayaking and canyoning. In the Fall, you can hit the bike trail for high risk mountain biking.     Guests leave their...
Strike A Pose In Bogota

Strike A Pose In Bogota

Strike A Pose In Bogota Dancing In the Streets Interview by Lauri Lyons     Take a walk on the wild side of Bogotá with film and video director Jacob Krupnick and the illustrious dancer Kia Labeija, as they explore Colombia’s alluring streets and hidden pathways.   Where are you from? Jacob Krupnick: For starters, I’m from NY, and I’ve lived in Brooklyn for the last 12 years. I’ve explored the world pretty enthusiastically on my own, and work brings me around on all kinds of cool missions.   Have you traveled to Latin America before? I spent a couple weeks in Ecuador in 2014 shooting documentaries for Intel, but aside from that, I’d never spent time further south than Mexico.   How did your collaboration with Pillar Point come about? Two years before directing Dove, I made a dance film for the same musician, Pillar Point, called Dreamin. We filmed in New York City, my home town, on the coldest weekend of the year. The music video was, to our surprise, a huge success, so when Pillar Point had a new album coming out, I wanted to work in a similar style. But the music video was due in January, and I had the dream of filming in a huge, colorful fruit market. I’ve filmed a lot in public spaces around New York, so it was time for a change.     Who is Kia Labeija? ​​Kia is an artist and Vogue dancer from New York. She’s amazing, and a joy to work with. Her focus is incredibly high. Her performance is intense and consistent. She’s a true professional,...
Damascus Déjà vu

Damascus Déjà vu

Damascus Déjà vu Life In Syria Interview by Lauri Lyons     There are people that choose a nomadic lifestyle for pleasure, there are people destined to become nomads because of their culture, and now in growing numbers, there are people that have become nomads because of war. Waref Abu Quba is a Syrian video director who is beautifully reframing the narrative of culture, memory, and migration. His award winning video In Damascus is an ethereal voyage into an ancient culture transforming in modern times.     Where are you from? Waref Abu Quba: I am from Al-Tall a town in Damascus Suburb area, it’s only 14 km far from Damascus. I’ve studied and lived in Damascus for a number of years.     When did you decide to leave Syria and why? Waref Abu Quba: As I graduated from the Faculty of Fine Arts in Damascus in 2007, I wanted to stay for a little longer in Syria and give it a try, starting my own business, so I started a small production company and things were going well for me at the beginning. Then comes a point in every Syrian male life, where we are offered two choices from the government: stay in the country and serve two horrible years in the military which is mandatory, or leave the country for five years to work and then pay a $5,000 fee, to be excused from the military service (which is a big amount of money for Syrians). I went with the second choice, and decided to leave Syria. I didn’t want to serve in Al-Assad army, so...
Jaipur’s Mahouti

Jaipur’s Mahouti

Jaipur’s Mahouti India’s Elephant Community Interview by Lauri Lyons Deborah Harse is a New York based photographer, director and marathon runner, who repeatedly answers the call of the wild. Today, she takes a break to reflect on her special passage to India.     What brought you to Jaipur, India? Deborah Harse:  At the beginning of 2012 I was without a project, and that is always uncomfortable. Winter had set in and that too, was uncomfortable. So I decided to escape the cold and head to India, for the fourth time. Before leaving I researched festivals and found that every year during the March full moon there was an elephant festival in Jaipur. It peaked my curiosity, so I packed my video camera thinking that I would get there a week before the festival and see what I could find.   How did you meet and build relationships with the Mahouti? Initially I was a bit apprehensive, not knowing how the elephants were treated. Nevertheless, upon arrival in Jaipur I began to ask drivers, fruit sellers, and random people on the street about the situation with elephants. These inquiries lead me to a suburb where three elephants and their mahouts resided. The elephants were in a compound and the mahouts lived in homes nearby. The mahouts do not own the elephants, but are their caretakers and drivers. They were very friendly and agreed to let me come the following morning, to film them going about their workday at Amber Fort, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. There tourists can ride elephants up the hill which leads to the top of the...

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